Geriatric Medicine

Health Education England, working across the East of England - Geriatric Medicine

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Geriatric Medicine is the largest medical specialty in the UK. 

Attractions of the specialty include an excellent work-life balance, high job satisfaction, high availability of consultant posts on achieving CCT and opportunities to subspecialize in areas such as stroke medicine, movement disorders and orthogeriatrics. Geriatricians often occupy prominent positions as medical educators and leaders in individual Trusts. Geriatricians practice patient-centred care as part of multi-disciplinary teams and are passionate patient advocates. 

If you choose Geriatric Medicine in the East of England, we pride ourselves in being able to offer trainees the details of their rotations at the beginning of their programme.

We currently have 54 rotations arranged in 11 clusters. Many of these rotations rotate through the teaching hospitals in Norwich and Cambridge and would also suit trainees who live in and around North London, Essex and the surrounding areas. Currently, approximately 20% of the trainees on our programme are actively undertaking research.

We appreciate that many trainees would like to commute less and be able to plan their lives in advance. To this end, trainees will be able to give their preferences on recruitment as to where they would like to work for their ST3 year. They will then be offered a meeting after this initial offer with the Training Programme Director (Dr Colin Mason) to discuss their preferred 5 year rotations thereafter where every effort will be made to design the programme around the personal and training needs of the trainee.

 

Latest News

 

Trainees from the region delivered the first ever Geris4Juniors Connect East of England Event on Saturday February 3rd in the Hexagon, Frank Lee Centre at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge. Over 60 delegates attended on the day which was by all accounts, a resounding success. 

Dr Nick Evans, ST5, has been chosen to give the invited trainee lecture in the RCP 500 Regional Meeting in the Wellcome Trust in Hinxton on March 22nd.

Round 1 recruitment opened on January 31st and will remain open for approximately 3 weeks. Interviews will take place in Peterborough on March 27th. 

There are currently posts available from next August in all of the following Trusts - Addenbrooke's, Norwich and Norfolk Hospital, Ipswich, King's Lynn, Watford, Luton, Harlow, Bedford, Colchester, Lister, Chelmsford and Southend Hospitals. 

The monthly Geriatrics Teaching Programme for the next 3 years is due on the website shortly.

We welcome to the programme: 

Dr Siddiq Omer - just started as a ST3 in Norwich and Norfolk Hospital

Dr Chris Osuafor - just about to start as a NIHR funded ACF with an interest in Stroke at Addenbrooke's Hospital.

 

And we bid farewell to:

Dr Emily McIntosh - who received her CCT in December and who has just started her consultant post in Ireland

 

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GERIATRIC MEDICINE FROM A TRAINEE PERSPECTIVE by Dr Ali Mackett (Trainee Representative)

GERIATRIC MEDICINE FROM A TRAINEE PERSPECTIVE by Dr Ali Mackett (Trainee Representative)

Introduction

Welcome to Geriatric Medicine in the East of England. As someone who has recently completed their training in the region, I cannot recommend it highly enough!

The East of England is a geographically diverse region with something to offer everyone in terms of lifestyle - from country living in the wilds of Norfolk and Suffolk, to the heights of academia and punting in Cambridgeshire to our southern colleagues in Essex and Bedfordshire with their ease of access to central London.

In terms of Teaching hospitals, most trainees will rotate through either Addenbrooke’sHospital or the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) in their 5 year scheme. We are also lucky to have a wide range of District General Hospitals over the region who offer some excellent sub-speciality training.

Within the region over the 5 years, you will develop experience in:

  • Movement disorders
  • Orthogeriatrics
  • Rehab and community geriatrics
  • Falls and syncope
  • Palliative care
  • Psychiatry of Old Age
  • Surgical Liaison
  • Stroke – additionally Stroke Fellowships/OOPEs are offered in Addenbrooke’s, NNUH, Southend and Watford (for those wanting to subspecialize in Stroke Medicine)

For academics, there are academic posts (ACFs) available at Addenbrooke’s and the NNUH which are advertised separately. Even if an academic post is not for you at one of those sites, it is still possible to get involved in research and audit. For those interested in education, medical students from Cambridge and UEA are present in many hospitals across the region meaning there are plenty of opportunities to get involved if you wish. Furthermore, the Deanery awards trainee bursaries for those wishing to undertake higher training in education.

In terms of training opportunities. there are monthly regional SpR training days organised on a rolling basis. Each study day is mapped to the curriculum and is on a 2.5 year rotation to ensure all trainees get the opportunity to cover the entire curriculum. There are also regional BGS (British Geriatric Society) meetings along with sub-speciality BGS meetings and the national BGS AGMs held biannually. The other excellent meeting that I highly recommend is the annual BGS Trainee’s weekend.

As part of the geriatric curriculum, you will be expected to complete the SCE which is a multiple choice exam similar in feel to MRCP part 2 before your CCT.

The Geriatric trainees in the East of England are a very friendly, welcoming bunch of people who are extremely supportive. If there are any questions, please contact any of the Trainee Reps for further information, our Training Programme Director, Dr Mason, or, failing that, ask any of the current trainees.

Best of luck!

Ali Mackett (Outgoing Trainee Representative, now Consultant Geriatrician, Addenbrooke’s Hospital)

 

Useful contacts

Training Programme Chair                   Dr James Edwards James.edwards@nnuh.nhs.uk

Training Programme Director (TPD)     Dr Colin Mason colin.mason1@addenbrookes.nhs.uk

 

Trainee representatives

Dr Fiona MacMillan fifimac1@doctors.org.uk

Dr Kat Mattishent   mattishent@doctors.org.uk

 

Helpful information

Geriatric curriculum 2010 – a little dull but this is what you need to cover over the next 5 years

http://www.jrcptb.org.uk/sites/default/files/2010%20Geriatric%20Medicine%20Curriculum%20%28amendments%202013%29.pdf

ARCP decision aid 2010 (revised 2014) – print this out and put it on your wall. Read it every day! This is what you need to do broken down year by year

http://www.jrcptb.org.uk/sites/default/files/2010%20Geriatric%20Medicine%20Curriculum%20%28amendments%202013%29.pdf

 

SCE resources

A. Best of Five MCQs for the Geriatric Medicine SCE (Oxford Higher Specialty Training Higher Revision) Duncan Forsyth (Author), Stephen Wallis (Author)  - Excellent resource, best book I used for the exam and I can highly recommend. The answers come with a brief explanation and references.

B. MCQs in Geriatric Medicine for Postgraduate Examinations (MasterPass) (MasterPass Series) [Paperback] Roger Gabriel (Author) - gives 350 questions but poorly written and some of the answers are incorrect. If you want to cover as many questions as possible go nuts otherwise avoid.

C. Rapid Review of Medicine in Old Age (Medical Rapid Review Series) [Paperback] Michael Vassallo (Author), Stephen Allen (Author) - Written by the man who writes the SCE, however the book is 7 years out of date. It is worth looking through to get an idea of his writing style. The questions do not reflect the SCE format so my advice would be borrowing it from colleagues or the library.

D. Essential Geriatrics [Paperback] Henry Woodford (Author) - Excellent book, highly recommended even to people not taking the exam. Easy to digest and every statement is referenced. Good bank of 100 questions however I think these questions are a little harder than the exam.

E. Lecture Notes: Elderly Care Medicine [Paperback] Claire G. Nicholl (Author), K. Jane Wilson (Author) - Another excellent book, gives a good grounding although a little more basic than Woodford's book but it does have details regarding ethics, law, walking aids which are all known to come up in the exam.

F. http://www.bgs.org.uk/index.php/assessment-66 - this is the most comprehensive collection of mock SCE papers. These are probably of similar standard to the actual exam. I believe they have 3 or 4 mock papers on there.

G. BGS Trainees’ weekend - very useful revision/update weekend for about £75. They try to cover topics from the exam and give a SCE mock exam.

H. MRCP 2 websites - consider signing up to these to practice exam technique. Also some of the questions in the actual exam felt a lot more like MRCP 2 than SCE so may be more helpful than it first seems.

 

Helpful hints

  • Use the first year to find your feet – don’t get too bogged down in the detail!
  • Make a plan early how you are going to cover the curriculum – some hospitals such as Ipswich have excellent community and tilt table exposure whereas others have excellent experience in orthogeriatrics so don’t miss opportunities
  • The current guidance for clinics is 183 for GIM, they are less prescriptive in geriatrics. It works out roughly 36 per year. Remember you can count 5 ward referrals as one clinic and a half day community session also can be counted. There is no requirement currently to have a clinic logbook.  Instead, we use a Firth calculator to calculate clinic numbers where you say your experience and your supervisor countersigns it
  • The current guidance for acute take experience is 1000 patients before CCT. This is very easy to manage. In some places, it feels like you could cover it in a single week of nights! There is no requirement for logbooks currently with on take experience again documented on the Firth calculator
  • Attempt the SCE at ST4 or ST5 level
  • Consider OOPE or higher degrees early as it takes a long time to organise and you may run out of time otherwise
  • Rotations swaps are a contentious issue – I would recommend finding someone to swap with and then approaching the TPD
  • Attend as many study days as possible as these are fantastic generally and you get to know all the other trainees and it’s often helpful to swap advice
Geriatric Training Days

Training days 2017/2018

2017

January

Fri

13th

Perioperative Medicine in Older People

Chelmsford

 

February

   

No study day

 
 

March

Wed

8th

Palliative care

Yarmouth

 

April

Thu

13th

Orthogeriatrics & Bone Health

Cambridge

 

May

Fri

12th

Psychiatry in Old Age

Colchester

 

June

Wed

14th

Infectious disease / HAI

Norwich

 

July

Thu

13th

Management & the NHS

Huntingdon

 

August

   

No study day

 
 

September

Fri

15th

Patient Safety & Quality Improvement

Harlow

 

October

Wed

11th

Movement disorders

Ipswich

 

November

Thu

9th

Continence

Luton

 

December

Fri

15th

Delirium

Cambridge

 

2018

January

Wed

10th

Vulnerability in old age, mental capacity, mental health legislation

Norwich

 

February

 

 

No study day

 

 

March

Thu

8th

Nutrition

Bury

 

April

Fri

13th

Tissue viability

Chelmsford

 

May

Wed

9th

Homeostasis

Peterborough

 

June

Thu

14th

Research and Audit Day

NAPP

 

July

Fri

13th

Ethics

Cambridge

 

August

 

 

No study day

 

 

September

Wed

12th

Falls & Syncope

Norwich

ARCP Tip Sheets
Further Advice

Further Advice

Position

Location

Dr Colin Mason                                    

Training Programme Director & Consultant Physician                                                       Cambridge University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust                                        
Dr James Edwards Training Committee Chair
& Consultant Physician
The Norfolk & Norwich University
Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Dr Fraz Mir Head of School of Medicine
& Associate Postgraduate Dean
Health Education England, working across the East of England
Jasmin King School of Medicine Administrator  Post Graduate Medical Centre - Cambridge University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust

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