We would love to welcome you to train in the East of England where we strive to bring together enthusiastic trainers, excellence in training and our dynamic talented trainees.

We combine incredible curriculum training with unrivalled opportunities in areas such as leadership, teaching, research, global health and simulation. Our trainees succesfully move onto fantastic fellowships or consultant posts, often chosing to remain in our wonderful region. Trainee well-being is core to what we do and we have several measures to support those who are struggling for whatever reason.

Living in the East of England offers beautiful surroundings, affordable homes, superb schools and friendly cities and towns. You will never regret coming to live in our region and we look forward to welcoming you here. International Medical Graduates are incredibly welcome and we will work hard to help you settle in and succeed.Not sure what area to train in after foundation - we offer novel Clinical Development Fellowships to help you figure it out, whilst still developing your C.V. in preparation for training program application.

Below are some of the common questions regarding our various Schools of Medical Training, reviews from some of our trainees and an introduction to our Heads of Schools. 

 

Foundation FAQ's

 

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

(1+1)

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through (though can enter at F2)

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

All of the acute trusts and mental health trusts and some GP practices

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Yes, all of the posts are localised to a trust per year, although the community placements may be at GP or mental health trust for 4 months. Between the F1 and F2, posts in EBH FS predominantly stay in the same trust, whereas approx. 3/4 of EAFS rotate trusts between a teaching hospital and DGH between F1 and F2.

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

National recruitment through ORIEL

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

At F1 the professional practice week in the acute trust, including shadowing period paid before your post commences. For overseas doctor, an additional bespoke welcome to the NHS programme.

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

We follow a 60 hours taught programme, with a core 30 hours of simulation, sub-regional teaching and local teaching, and a 30 hours trainee choice which is essentially predominantly local with simulation and subregional available.

How many days of study leave do I get?

15 days [90 hours] in F1 in which 60 hours is the taught programme, additional 3 hours are e-learning and 12 hours are ALS . In F2, again 60 hours [10 days] is taught programme, 5 days for a taster and then 15 potential days for aspirational leave.

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

We offer all trainees a full day of hi fidelity simulation and a minimum of a half day of supervised VR simulation. Trainees can choose to increase this in their non core 60 hours, and we suggest 3 days of sim training. Non supervised VR simulation is available with booking at trainees discretion.

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

PSA if not passed at medical school. ALS.

We provide SCRIPT e-learning support both for prescribing and specifically PSA.

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

This is the foundation programme, but we have some priority programmes that are targeted at specialties, and include additional training opportunities. these are in GP/ mental health / paediatrics / pre hospital care.

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

We have academic programmes in research at CATO and NATO, and educational academics with educational research at 3 HEI.

OOPR is not supported during foundation, exceptional circumstances only for TOFP please see the website.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

No, but we are developing the option to stream some of our programmes towards readiness for an F3 global health post foundation.

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/foundation

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • We prioritise your education with our innovative 60 hours taught programme, including VR access
  • We support our trainees, providing a friendly ear as you start in medicine 
  • We offer more focussed support for those with health, caring or other responsibilities

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent the Foundation Program and why?

A supermini. We are small, nippy, great as a starter car and also reliable. You will reach your destination.

Foundation Trainee Review
Foundation School Director
Dr Helen Johnson

 

I was a consultant in obstetrics and Gynaecology, with subspecialist interest in urogynaecology. I went to St Mary’s Medical School, and did my specialty training, of which some was LTFT, in the Yorkshire deanery before settling in Cambridgeshire. I was heavily involved in education in the school of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the national education urogynaecology subcommittee and in foundation. From February 2019 I have been working full time at HEE EoE. 

We focus on training our doctors for their future within the NHS, providing rotations that are balanced and mapped against the curriculum. Our busy hospitals provide you with a broad experience as well as making sure that you have the opportunity to look at sub-specialities. We pay special attention to our teaching and training, with communication and personal skills training as well as a high class simulation training programme and the first area to run a full Virtual Reality programme. We are also very keen to provide personal pastoral support, whether this be the opportunity for less than full time training, our mentoring and support programmes our just an ear when things seem difficult.

We aim to improve our foundation experience year on year, listening to your voices and being responsive to them.

One of my passions in foundation is around making foundation inclusive. We are strong supporters of those requiring to be LTFT or have a need for more considered rotations. In this I have been proud to sit on the GMC working part for the welcomed and valued guidance. 

For more information on our educational programme please see education opportunities

Anaesthesia FAQ's

 

How many years is the training program?

Anaesthetics: 7 or 8 with ACCS 

ITU: single CCT 7-8, dual 8.5

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Decoupled

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

All

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Yes

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Centrally

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

All attend an induction day at start of CT1, there is local trust departmental induction for all CTs and STs at the start of any rotation in a new trust at any stage of training program, written information also circulated from the school as well as local trusts

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Core: held monthly in south, middle and Norwich; trainees can choose

Higher anaesthetics: monthly, same theme in two locations trainees choose, ICM alternate monthly one location scattered around the region

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Lots!

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

Part 1 and part 2 FRCA, FFICM at end of ICM for ICM only

Lots of preparation for all elements of the exam

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

Lots

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

ACFs starting at higher training from CUH, Anaesthetics has a recognised research year in the program for 1-2 trainees at any one time at ST5 or 6.

We actively support OOPR opportunities.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Lots 

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/anaesthesia

 

AnaesthesiaTrainee Review

Coming soon!

Have a look at reasons to come and train in EoE in Anaesthesia!

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/anaesthesia/train-us

 

Anaesthesia Head of School
Rowan Burnstein

I am a consultant in Anaesthesia and Intensive care at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, with a subspecialist interest in Neurocritical Care and Major Trauma. I was educated in Sydney, graduating from the University of Sydney in 1985. I subsequently undertook the majority of my postgraduate training in anaesthetics and intensive care in the East of England, including completing a PhD within the University of Cambridge. I am a fellow of both the Royal College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine. I am also a Fellow, College Lecturer and Director of Studies at Magdalene College, Cambridge. Since becoming a consultant I have undertaken a variety of leadership roles prior to becoming Head of School. These have included Chair of the Cambridge Research Ethics Committee (2007-11), Clinical Director of Neurocritical Care (2006-13), Clinical Director Perioperative Services and Adult Critical Care (2013-17), Clinical Lead for Organ Donation (2012-19). I have been Regional Advisor for Intensive care (2007-13) and have completed an NHS Clinical Leadership Fellowship (2011-2). I am currently the Clinical Lead and Intensive Care Lead for the Cambridge Yangon Trauma Intervention project, and a partner researcher in the NIHR Global Health Research Group in Neurotrauma, based in Cambridge.   My research interests currently focus on applications of principles of health systems engineering and service improvement, particularly in the context of global health (traumatic brain injury), medical education and high risk surgical patients.

Dental FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

3

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Please see the Orthodontic Specialist training pages on the HEE East of England website for full details.

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/dental

 

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

Please see the Orthodontic Specialist training pages on the HEE East of England website for full details.

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/dental

 

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Please see the Orthodontic Specialist training pages on the HEE East of England website for full details.

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/dental

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Via national Recruitment, currently run by HEE North East.  Deadlines and full details on the COPDEND website

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

ST1-ST3 About 2 weeks introductory course at the London teaching hospitals part of the rotations.  Local hospital inductions.

ST4-ST5 post-CCST local hospital inductions

https://www.copdend.org/postgraduate-training/national-recruitment-for-s...

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

ST1-ST3

Weekly half-day lecture programme based at Royal London Hospital year 1.  Alternate week lecture programme at Guy’s hospital year 2&3.  Seminars, and clinical teaching at the London teaching hospitals and the hospitals in east of England, details vary depending upon the post.

ST4-ST5 post CCST

Attendance at regional and national courses to acquire the additional competencies above ST3 level.

How many days of study leave do I get?

ST1-ST3

Lecture programme as above.  1 day of dedicated study time to complete higher degree. Additional study leave for key approved conferences and courses

ST4-ST5 post CCST

Standard amount in STR contract

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Not applicable to specialty

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

MOrth of one of the Royal Colleges for ST1-ST3 posts

MClinDent/MSc/DClinDen for ST1-ST3 posts.  Which degree is taken depends upon the London teaching hospital that the post rotates to.

Intercollegiate FDS(Ortho) for the ST4-ST5 post-CCST posts

Lots of preparation for all exams formally in revision courses and informally with consultants who do mock exam preparation in each unit.

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

Not applicable

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

Doing a higher degree with research component is a mandatory part of the ST1-ST3 trainng in this specialty and is undertaken concurrently with STR training.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

No

 

More information

Where can I go for more information

Please see the Orthodontic Specialist training pages on the HEE East of England website for full details.

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/dental

 

British orthodontic Society website

https://www.bos.org.uk

 

COPDEND website

https://www.copdend.org

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • Good training units in modern departments with high consultant trainer to trainee ratio
  • Good rotation links to London teaching hospitals give experience in a different setting, interaction with a larger group of peers and opportunities to undertake publishable research during study for the higher degree
  • Relatively small number of trainees means that supervisors and TPD know who you are and are very approachable to help with problems.

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent your specialty and why?

Not one of the flashy show-off ones which I bet many of the other specialties picked!  Pick any car that you think is assured and quietly self-confident and great to drive without showing off a mid-life crisis.

Dental Trainee Review

Coming Soon!

Dental Head of School
Maria Ross-Russell

Role: Regional Postgraduate Deputy Dental Dean (Dental Workforce), Midlands and East

Maria is the Regional Postgraduate Deputy Dental Dean across Midlands and East.  She is also a GDC registered Specialist in Special Care dentistry and a Tutor for the University of Cambridge Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education.  Maria’s portfolio includes HEE’s Dental Workforce Development, Performer List Validation by Experience and Restoring the Efficiency of Registrants workstreams. She is a member of the national Dental Workforce Development Advisory Group.  Maria also represents the Midlands and East Postgraduate Dental School on the East of England Heads of School committee. 

Emergency Medicine FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

6

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

16 Trusts, including 1 Major Trauma Centre (Addenbrookes)

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

East - Norwich, Ipswich, Great Yarmouth, King's Lynn;

Essex - Southend, Colchester, Chelsmford, Basildon, Harlow;

South - Watford, Luton, Stevenage;

North - Bury St Edmunds, Peterborough, Bedford

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

National through London for ACCS, Yorks & Humber for ST3/DRE-EM/HST

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

First regular regional training day set aside for induction

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Monthly regional training days for each level. Additional region based training provided.

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Funded placement on ACCS simulation day for all ACCS ST1. ST3-6 simualtion courses also provided. Simulation included within monthly regional training for HSTs.

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

FRCEM all parts - primary and intermediate by end of ST3, final critical appraisal, QIP, SAQ and OSCE by ST6.

All parts of the exam are covered by regional exam prep courses.

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

PHEM, PEM

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

Academic training is available based in Addenbrookes

We do support OOPR opportunities

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

East of England partners Global Health Fellowships placements to rural South Africa for one year between ST3 and ST4

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/emergency_medicine

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • Support for flexible careers
  • Thorough curriculum coverage through regional training
  • Wide range of hospital environments from urban to rural

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Emergency Medicine and why?

Land Rover Defender. It's a classy reliable workhorse that stands out without needing to look flashy. Goes anywhere, copes with all different situations including extreme battlefield, lots of grunt but still cruises nicely at speed.

 

Emergency Medicine Trainee Review
Kashif

Hi, my name is Kashif and I am delighted to welcome you to the EOE School of Emergency Medicine page. I started my training as an ST1 in East of England in 2017 and I am so glad that I chose this deanery as a run through Emergency Medicine trainee.

East of England has a good mixture of Hospitals offering an opportunity to learn Emergency Medicine with all its varied dimensions – I have enjoyed learning the different challenges of Emergency Medicine at both Addenbrookes Hospital (a leading major trauma centre) and at West Suffolk Hospital (an excellent DGH). EOE Prehospital and Paediatric Emergency programs are very sought after and during my rotations I have had the opportunity of working and learning with the dual training emergency trainees and consultants which has helped me better plan for my own personal training path as I move towards my HST years. Our ACCS program treats all the ACCS streams equally, so I had the same opportunities in all rotations as the trainee from their own base stream. This equipped me with the right skills and understanding of Acute Medicine, Anaesthetics and Intensive Care Medicine and boosted my confidence before my return back to Emergency Medicine as an ST3.

We all know that Emergency Medicine training can be tough and demanding so it is crucial that one trains in a supportive deanery. The EOE school of Emergency Medicine is committed to both training and emergency medicine trainees - I can testify to this as I am one of the trainee representatives since my ST1 year. As a trainee representative I have found Dr Nam Tong (head of school of EM) and Dr Pawan Gupta (TPD ST£/DREAM) to be supportive of trainees and have helped in facilitating rotation requests, LTFT requests and out of program requests. In the first two years of my training I have worked closely with Dr Diane Williamson (TPD ACCS) in addressing trainee concerns and requests in the deanery – and have found her to have trainee welfare as a core principle in her heart. I mention all of this, to let you know that should you chose to join our deanery – you will find yourself in a supportive and caring deanery willing to engage and listen to your needs. Come join us!

Emergency Medicine Head of School
Nam Tong

Associate dean and Head of School of Emergency Medicine

Undergraduate training in London Hospital Medical School. Junior posts in East London/Essex and Northern Ireland.

Helped set up first Medical Assessment Unit in Northern Ireland (Ulster Hospital Dundonald).

Research fellow with Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN), Manchester.

Completed specialty training in Emergency Medicine In East of England.

Consultant in Emergency Medicine Queen Elizabeth Hospital King’s Lynn since 2005, clinical lead since 2014.

Head of School of Emergency Medicine since April 2016.

Associate Dean since March 2018 with responsibility for introduction of Annual Development Planning and Workforce Transformation. Current project is Emergency Medicine International Training (EMIT) programme – a joint initiative between HEE, RCEM and SEMI (Society for Emergency Medicine India) for region-based recruitment of EM doctors with training focus.

General Practice FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

GP training programmes are based around 18 different areas in the East of England. All your hospital and general practice placements are all generally within the same geographical locality for all 3 years

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Not needed as all posts are generally in the same geographical area anyway.

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

It is a national process organised by the General Practice National Recruitment Office (GPNRO). Please see https://gprecruitment.hee.nhs.uk/

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Each training programme has a local induction and the School of General Practice organises another induction day in each of our 6 main county areas. We have a GP School induction pack and individual programmes and general practices also tend to have their own induction packs. When you start in a GP placement, you can generally expect to have at least 1-2 weeks where you shadow various members of the team so that you become familiar with how the practice works, local referral processes and how fantastic primary care is!

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Each of the 18 programmes organise a regular half day release programme which generally meets for 30 weeks of the year. We also have an extensive series of regional study days that are free of charge to our trainees and cover a range of topics, including exam preparation.

How many days of study leave do I get?

30 days a year, which includes the half day release programme for 15 days.

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

You will regularly do simulated consultations to help you develop your clinical and communication skills. You will also have access to simulation labs for examination and emergency care simulations

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

AKT = Applied Knowledge Test. This is an MCQ style exam. CSA = Consultation Skills Assessment. This is held in London at the RCGP headquarters and involves 13 simulated consultations where your data gathering, clinical management and interpersonal skills are assessed

​All the half day release programmes will help with preparation for both AKT and CSA. And the GP trainers in your practice placements will also be a great resource. We run clinical skills courses for ST1 and ST2 trainees as well as CSA preparation courses for ST3 trainees. We are also just about to purchase the Fourteen Fish AKT online preparation package for all our GP trainees.

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

We have 6 ST4 Fellowships in Educational Leadership and Quality Improvement

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

We have a number of academic trainees who are recruited to a 4 year training programme so that they spend an additional year focussed on their academic work and research.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Yes, we actively promote the Global Health Fellowships whereby trainees work in South Africa for a year between ST2 and ST3. In fact, we were one of the first regions to introduce this idea!

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/general_practice/interested-gp-training.

Please do contact any of our Training Programme Directors as well. Their contact details can be found on this website and they can often help find a taster placement for you in a GP practice.

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England?

  • It is a wonderful place to live and work, both during your training and once you are qualified. 
  • We have an amazing community of GP educators
  • We really want to know what you think will help you.

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent General Practice and why?

The London black cab - used by everyone, efficient, comfortable and a true British icon. We also move with the times whilst planning for all eventualities - now that lots of  London cabs are electric, with a backup petrol generator for emergencies.. Photo sent by email as I couldn't paste it in

General Practice Trainee Review
Nish & Nisha

I’m Nish, a GP registrar on the Cambridge scheme. I took year out of her GP training to be a Clinical Fellow to the National Medical Director in London, and then moved deaneries to the East of England in September 2017. 

I’ve absolutely loved being here since I moved. I felt hugely welcomed when I arrived, and I found the training programme directors to be very supportive and positive about the future of general practice. The other trainees on my scheme have also been equally helpful and friendly, and lots of them are pursuing interesting opportunities in academia, leadership and roles outside of medicine too, which makes for interesting perspectives when we meet for teaching.  My practice has been a fantastic learning experience for me too, and it feels like the registrars in the area are generally well supported wherever they end up. 

I’ve also become the RCGP trainee representative for Central and East of England and sit on the East Anglia RCGP Faculty board- mostly because I found senior GPs in the area to be encouraging and supportive of taking up additional roles like this. 

I have decided to pursue a local ST4 leadership and commissioning fellowship in the coming months too. This feels like an invaluable opportunity to hone my clinical skills, whilst also being given the privilege to undertake some postgraduate education and get involved in local leadership endeavours. The healthcare system here is evolving rapidly, and I’m deeply excited about the future of general practice here and the career opportunities it will provide.  

Overall, I have found my time here to be a rewarding experience, and would recommend it wholeheartedly to anyone considering applying to the deanery. 

 

Nisha (GPST2 currently rotated in Medicine in Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital)

I met the most outstanding, inspirational and dedicated mentors while doing the tasks of preparing myself to become of professional GP. They are my "true idols" who keeps me going.

General Practice Head of School
Janet Rutherford

I am a GP from Bury St Edmunds, West Suffolk. Having been a GP tutor, GP Trainer, Training Programme Director and Associate Dean, I am now the Head of School for general practice. This means that I have responsibility for the operational delivery of GP training within our region. This task is made much easier by working closely with both the fantastic teams at HEE as well as all our GP educators. I am really keen to keep our trainees at the centre of everything we do – how can we best help our trainees to achieve their potential and succeed as the GPs of the future?

I am also the Associate Dean leading on the ARCP process for GP trainees and am keen to make this process as straight forward as possible for all concerned. My other interest is in supporting educators, especially those who are trying to help trainees with complex needs. 

Medicine FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

2-3 years (depending on your future choice of Specialty). https://www.jrcptb.org.uk/internal-medicine

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Decoupled - after 2-3 years of IMT training you have to reapply for Higher Specialist Training (exception is Academic Training)

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

All East of England Trusts support Internal Medicine training. 

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Yes. About half of the rotations rotate around the 2 teaching hospitals (Cambridge and Norwich) with the other half being entirely contained within the same Trust

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Nationally although we do 3-4 local interviews days per year so trainees in our region usually get interviewed in Cambridge. 

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Local and Regional Induction 

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

4 regional teaching days a year. A simulation and procedural skills courses in the first 2 years. Regional PACES and MRCP Part 1 teaching and £1000 pounds per year per trainee for commercial MRCP courses

How many days of study leave do I get?

up to 30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Procedural courses in the first year. Human factors courses during the first 2 years

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

MRCP part 1, part 2 and PACES – yes regional Part 1 and PACES courses and £1000 pounds per year per trainee for commercial MRCP courses

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

IMT is a "core" program for before you start to specialise beyond that. Re-application during IMT 2 or 3 is required for that.

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

We have a large and active ACF programme recruited separately to national IMT recruitment in Cambridge and Norwich. Successful candidates still need to be deemed appointable in national IMT recruitment.

OOPRs cannot be taken in the first or last years of the programme so usually cannot be taken in the IM1 and IM2 years. However, it is possible on occasion for exceptions to be made. 

More information

Where can I go for more information

Lots of information on the HEE EoE CMT website regarding our training days, rotations, ARCP preparation, LTFT training, study leave, professional support and well-being amongst other things. The TPDs, Jasmine Patel (Jasmine.Patel@ipswichhospital.nhs.uk and Colin Mason colin.mason1@addenbrookes.nhs.uk are always happy to be contacted by potential applicants – no query too small!). 

Website : https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/medicine

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • High quality teaching delivered from international centres of excellence
  • Regional mock MRCP Part 1 and PACES teaching and financial support (£1000 pounds per year for trainees to attend commercial PACES courses)
  • Easily commutable and self-contained rotations
Medicine Trainee Review
Ieuan & Martha

I am Ieuan, a CMT year 2, and Academic Clinical Fellow.  I am also the chair of the East of England CMT/ IMT training committee. 

Training in the East of England has been great fun. I have been fortunate enough to be placed at Addenbrooke's Hospital (Cambridge University Hospitals Trust) for the past 2 years. The deanery has been extremely supportive of my training and are always looking to actively improve it. Addenbrooke's has been an excellent place to train, and has a strong teaching programme to help us obtain MRCP- boasting a very successful pass rate! The academic opportunities have been large and I have been well supported in pursing these.  

The region offers a good mix of district hospitals, tertiary hospitals and national centres, I have found the experience very supportive and friendly. I would highly recommend training in the region and have found a lot more support and training opportunities here than friends in other regions.

 

My name is Martha. I am a CT1 trainee in ACCS-Acute Medicine in Ipswich and one of the educational reps for ACCS East of England. I chose to train in the east of England as it offers access to academic centres but also allows for training in smaller hospital settings where more practical experience may be gained. I have found the deanery to be very open to let trainees attend further education and training courses. I have also made new friends in the training programme that are all in different streams of ACCS and will have a different take on the same problem - which is helpful in a clinical setting. The deanery is very organised and out RCP tutor takes good care of us as ACCS-AM trainees. I would encourage anyone considering training to look into training here - as you might find yourself pleasantly surprised.

 

Medicine Head of School
Fraz Mir

Fraz  Mir is a Consultant Physician at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom and an Associate Lecturer in the Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge. In November 2017, he was appointment as Head of School of Postgraduate Medicine and Associate Postgraduate Dean, Health Education East of England. In this role, he is responsible for overseeing the clinical training and welfare of over 500 doctors across the region and has a special interest in the Medical Training Initiative scheme. He became a bye-fellow of King’s College, Cambridge in May 2018 and Director of Clinical Studies from September 2018. From June 2013-2017, he was Associate International Director for the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) London. 

His clinical and research interests are in the fields of therapeutics and hypertension. 

Obs & Gynae FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

7

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through (although there is a small entry at ST3.

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

All 17 teaching hospitals and DGHs

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

No - our trainees have previously said they do not want this. They are able to opt to stay in one geographical area and we aim to avoid any commute longer than an hour unless the trainee requests a specific hospital.

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Nationally- currently in Manchester. Recruitment opens in November.

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Deanery induction at the Deanery site in August

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Teaching organised throughout the region. We aim to provide as many of the compulsory courses as possible locally. There is a compulsory Trainee prize day once a year.

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Most hospitals will have some simulation facilities and run obstetric emergency (PROMPT) courses. A number of the deanery teaching courses are simulation based. At a more senior level we also offer cadaveric training.

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

Part 1 (by end of ST2), Part 2 and 3 by end of ST5

Yes preparation is organised - local teaching and regional courses for all 3

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

Subspecialty training in Maternal fetal medicine, reproductive medicine and urogynaecology in Cambridge. Gynae oncology in Cambridge and Norwich. All posts are nationally advertised and trainees from our region have a high success rate in appointments to posts both in and out of the Deanery

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

ACF in both Cambridge and Norwich. ACL post in Cambridge. Most hospitals are involved in multicentre trials which trainees can be involved in and there are more formal research opportunities mainly in Cambridge and Norwich. The School has an Associate TPD with a brief to support academic training and trainees in the Region.

Yes OOPRs are supported as long as the Research is aimed to lead to a higher degree and is properly funded. Support in this is obtained from the ATPD

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Yes- we support ST1-2 trainees to spend a year overseas as a Global Health Fellow and are developing programmes for short term placements overseas. We also support OOPE for trainees wishing to be involved in such things as VSO.

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

www.heeoe.nhs.uk/obstetrics_gynaecology.

Information on training in the east of England. www.rcog.org.uk/en/careers-training. Information on the UK training programme and career progression

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England?

  • Currently we are 4th in the Uk for overall quality of training with Southend being top in the UK. 
  • We offer a flexible training programme that tries to maximise opportunities for all trainees and focusing on quality of life.
  • We encourage trainees to develop other interests through the use of OOPE and LTFT working to produce well rounded employable Consultants.
  •  
Obs & Gynae Trainee Review
Nicole & Charlie

Hi - I am Nicole (ST5). From the moment I accepted by training post in O&G in the East of England I have never regretted it.

There are a variety of options of where you would like to work in the region to provide a rounded experience; from the larger teaching hospitals and tertiary centres, to the smaller and more rural general district hospitals. Socially there is plenty to do as well, whether is be popping to the coast to enjoy the brisk English waters and quirky seaside towns, going to see some seal pups, popping to the local city to enjoy a bit of shopping, the endless restaurants catering for all tastes, experiencing a wide variety of sporting options (for me personally Basketball and Athletics are my passion) and so much more!

The east of England deanery is also a great option for families. I myself was born and raised in the region, and now I have been lucky enough to have two children who are happily growing up here too. There are some great nurseries and schools, plus lots of lovely rural places to visit for some fun family days out (Rooar! Dinosaur Park is one of our favourites). I have been really supported with my maternity leave and return to work both times. The deanery now run a return to work course available for all trainees who have has time out of programme for any reason, as well as the offer of two weeks supernumery to provide that extra bit of help and support.

Would I recommend living and working here? In a word...yes!

 

Hi, I’m Charlie, an ST6 trainee on the East of England Obstetrics and Gynaecology rotation.

I have been based at Peterborough City Hospital for the last 2 years, but have also rotated through West Suffolk Hospital and Addenbrooke’s Hospital. I am a 60% LTFT trainee and have been for the last 5 years due to childcare responsibilities. The Eastern Deanery and regional hospitals I have been in work hard to accommodate LTFT trainees; and it is common to be able to complete 2 years in a unit instead of moving on a yearly basis like many of our fulltime colleagues. I have found this really important to maintain continuity of learning and improve skill acquisition given my LTFT status.

The range of hospitals available to rotate to within the deanery is good, and all emphasise varying aspects of O+G, with differing patient populations and thus needs. The units I have worked in have prioritised trainee learning and enabled me to gain the broad experience needed to meet the requirements of the O+G curriculum. There are a large number of supportive consultants, keen to teach and improve trainee experience.

I would highly recommend the Eastern region as an excellent place to undertake O+G training.

Obs & Gynae Head of School
Charlotte Patient

I am a Consultant Obstetrician at Addenbrookes with a special interest in maternal medicine. In the past I have been the Clinical Lead for Obstetrics, College tutor at Addenbrookes and Associate TPD. I have an interest in Global Health and work in a collaborative partnership with the University of Makerere and Mulago Hospital in Uganda and am on the MTI and Volunteering Committee at the RCOG.

Ophthalmology FAQs

How many years is the training program?

            7 years (ST1-7)

Is the training run through or decoupled?

            Run through  (ST1-2 general; ST3+ subspecialty focused)

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

            Main Teaching Units: Cambridge & Norwich

            11 DGH’s divided as below into sub-rotations

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

            West   : Cambridge, Luton, Huntingdon, Peterborough

            East    : Norwich, Bury St.Edmunds, Ipswich & Great Yarmouth

            South : Cambridge, Watford, Stevenage, Chelmsford, Colchester, Southend

 

RECRUITMENT

How is recruitment organized?

            National recruitment is organized through the Severn Deanery and opens every November, interviews Jan / Feb.

            http://www.severndeanery.nhs.uk/recruitment/

 

INDUCTION

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Regional Norwich Induction week in August for all new EoE trainees

Simulation training on EyESi in first few months

 

CURRICULUM TEACHING & STUDY LEAVE

How is the regional teaching program structured?

            Top rated teaching program in the country (GMC survey)

10 Core training days : covers curriculum; talks in morning and OSCEs in afternoon, usually with patients. Satisfaction rating >9.6/10 

20+ Additional Regional teaching days : exam preparation, simulation, governance, professional, research and academic meetings

            Weekly 1/2 day teaching at Norwich & monthly at Cambridge

            https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/ophth/teaching_program

How many days of study leave do I get?

            30 total

            10 used to attend core training days 

            20 remaining to attend additional regional training days, national / international meetings / exam study

 

SIMULATION TRAINING

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

            3 x Eyesi cataract simulators: Great Yarmouth, Luton, Cambridge

            Cataract / Complications simulation day

            Trabeculectomy simulation day

            Laser simulation day

            Cadaveric Strabismus training & Oculoplastics training

            Trauma Simulation training day

            https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/ophth/simulation

 

EXAMS

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

            Part 1: completed by end of ST2 (can be done prior to entry)

            Refraction exam: completed by end of ST3

            Part 2 written and clinical (viva/OSCE): ideally completed by ST5-6

We run regional exam preparation days for Part 2 and Refraction exam.

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/ophthalmology/exam-preparation

            Also our core training days are exam orientated with OSCE stations.

 

FELLOWSHIPS / SUBSPECIALTY TRAINING

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

            We have pre-CCT final year fellowships (known as Trainee Selected Components TSCs) in all subspecialties. 

There are also ample post CCT fellowships as well.

 

RESEARCH    

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

            ST3+ trainees are given 1 session a week for Research (in addition to standard ST1-7: 1 session for audit/admin and session for teaching).

We encourage and support OOPR applications in and outside our region. Best time to consider this is between ST2-3 or after final Part 2 exam

We have two professorial units and multiple other research opportunities as well as a trainee led research network linked to NIHR.

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/ophthalmology/research

 

GLOBAL HEALTH

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

            We support trainees who want to consider going abroad for global health projects and OOPR opportunities.

We are currently developing a formal global health ophthalmology fellowship post too.

 

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/ophthalmology

We have several events (including the induction week) that we welcome prospective trainees to. We can also arrange taster weeks in any of our units. Contacts found on the website above.

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England?

  • TOP of GMC Trainee Survey (2018 & 2017): rated highest average across all 18 domains
  • TOP Exam results: We have had >90% success over last 2 years at Part 2 clinical exams
  • TOP Regional Training (2018,19): 1st out of 17 regions in the whole UK

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Ophthalmology and why?

The Aston Martin. We are the cool, sleek top end of the luxury market with great balance between functional driving (work) and enjoyment (well-being). Amazing and challenging technology at the heart of what we do, awesome user and passenger (patient) experience (satisfaction). We don’t get taken out late at night and are the epitomy of speed, calmness and in control of our driving. Top end research avenues, great travel opportunities (for the altruistic) and most of all a lot of fun. Hard to get one (training number) but once you have the keys, you never want another car.

 

 

Ophthalmology Trainee Review
Harry & Ollie

My name is Harry and I have been the Trainee Rep for the East of England Ophthalmologists for the last 3 years. I started my ophthalmology training in 2012 as an ST1 in Peterborough. 

East of England is a great deanery to train in. There are some superb hospitals offering fantastic clinical, surgical and academic training. For example, I have published at least one paper from each hospital I’ve rotated to, I completed my first corneal transplant in my ST3 year, finished all my FRCOphth examinations before ST4 year and completed over 530 cataracts by ST4!. These achievements were only possible with the support of some fantastics mentors I have had the privilege to work for. The trainee program director, Narman Puvanachandra has a very understanding approach to trainees’ needs and will do his utmost to facilitate rotation requests, including my request to take two years out of program to work at St Thomas’ Hospital, London as a research fellow for an MD(Res) at King’s College London. The Deanery has also supported me to take a PGCert in Medical Education course at Newcastle University via distance learning.

I strongly recommend training in the East of England and compared to my friends on other large rotations, our training experience is a fantastic and friendly one.

 

Hi, I’m Ollie and I have just completed 7 fabulous years of Ophthalmic Specialist Training (OST) in the East of England Deanery. During that time, I settled in the beautiful City of Cambridge and rotated through Addenbrookes and 5 other regional hospitals on the Western side of the deanery. All of the units have been incredibly supportive with some great surgical and clinical mentors. The EOE deanery offers the perfect mix of excellent teaching hospitals where you get solid teaching and exposure to tertiary pathology as well as regional hospitals where you are able to quickly get up to speed on surgical numbers. It is indicative of the success of surgical mentorship that many trainees in the region complete well over 1,000 cataracts during their 7 years.

Our Trainee Programme Director Narman has also been extremely supportive of extracurricular endeavours.  I was Chair of the College's Ophthalmologists in Training Group and completed the Cambridge University Chief Residents’ Management and  Leadership Development Programme.
Having gained my CCT this Summer, I am currently completing a Fellowship in Cornea at Moorfields Eye Hospital and I will be starting a Substantive Consultant Post at Queen’s Hospital, Romford next year.
I could not recommend the East of England Deanery more highly for your OST.
Ophthalmology Head of School
Tony Vivian

Tony Vivian is a paediatric ophthalmologist and adult strabismus surgeon at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge and West Suffolk Hospital, Bury St Edmunds. He has been Head of the School of Ophthalmology for 4 years. He is also on the Training Committee and Evaluation of Training sub-committee of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. He is the past president of the British and Irish Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Association (BIPOSA). He has a long-held interest in medical education and training, especially surgical training and simulation, mentorship and reflective practice. 

Current projects include developing the Ophthalmology Mentorship program and creating a Global Health Fellowship.

Paediatrics FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

8

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

All 17

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Yes usually based in Luton Norwich or Cambridge, training rotations are organised to minimise travel

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Nationally

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

An annual regional training event for all new starters in HEE EOE

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Regional programmes for level 1 and level 2/3 trainees funded from School of Paediatrics budget

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Regional programmes funded from School of Paediatrics budget

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

MRCPCH

Regional preparation programmes funded from School of Paediatrics

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

SPIN & GRID

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

Mostly centred in Cambridge with academic department but programmes have been established in UEA / NNUH

OOPR supported for PhD

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Yes - 1st national Paediatric Global Health Fellowship program (trainee currently deployed in Eastern Cape)

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/paediatrics

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England?

  • Excellent Training
  • Camaraderie
  • Personalised training

 

 If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Paediatrics and why?

Golf - reliable, evolving with innovation, different models available

Paediatrics Trainee Review

Coming soon - check out the Paediatrics website for more details

Paediatrics Head of School
Vasanta Nanduri
Psychiatry FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

6 years : 3 years core training, mostly 3 years higher training but some sub-specialties vary and dual training available.

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Mostly decoupled but run-through for (i) academic clinical fellowship posts and (ii) CAMH run-through (currently a pilot programme)

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

Core training and some higher training schemes within Trusts: Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire/Luton, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Norfolk/Suffolk.  Some higher training schemes more regional

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Regional higher training schemes have sub-units and flexibility to reduce commutes

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

National recruitment for entry in August and February for most specialties

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Local induction programmes organised by each Trust

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Regional teaching covers most essential requirements.  MRCPsych courses run in Herts, Cambridge and Essex. 

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Use of actors for simulated clinical encounters in regional training programme

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

In core training:  MRCPsych Paper A, Paper B, and CASC exam (a clinical OSCE exam)

Both MRCPsych courses and regional training for the clinical component which should be attended through core training.  Also communication skills teaching particularly to support International Medical Graduates

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

Subspecialty higher training in Liaison, Substance misuse, Perinatal and other subspecialties

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

Regional integrated academic training (In Cambridge and Norwich at present) through ACF and CL programmes.  Also higher trainees are entitled to 1 day per week for special interest sessions that can include research.

Yes OOPRs are supported, we have many opportunities for trainees wanting to take time out of training for research or other experiences.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Limited scope for international work at present

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

See our Deanery website ( https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/psychiatry ) or contact the Head of School

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • High quality of life, with urban and rural living allowing access to big cities and beautiful countryside and coast.
  • Excellent training programmes with dynamic educators 
  • Vibrant academic programmes to help you achieve your potential 

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Psychiatry and why?

Volkswagen Beetle:  Iconic, fashionable, internationally recognizable, upbeat and practical. There are more expensive and flashier cars out there, but this one is guaranteed to raise a smile and be a talking point. 

Psychiatry Trainee Review
Satnam

I started my higher training in General Adult Psychiatry with the East of England (EoE) deanery just over 2 years ago. I now live in the beautiful city of Cambridge. The best thing about training in Psychiatry in Eastern Region is that you can pick between different locations or hubs to potentially choose to train in. Within my current trust, I have worked in team across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

It has been massively rewarding 2 years so far. As a higher trainee in Psychiatry, the  Deanery offers many exciting opportunities for trainees to tailor their training experience to suit their personal and professional interests while achieving one's core competencies. A major reason why I chose EoE when applying for ST4 posts was the availability of substance misuse training locally. Such specialist training posts are far and few across the nation. I secured a spot for endorsement in substance misuse psychiatry through a competitive process and have since completed my year long sub-speciality endorsement in Substance Misuse Psychiatry. 

There are plenty of opportunities to pursue ones interest and hone skills in research, leadership & management, medical education and psychotherapy as well. I have successfully completed the Chief Resident Management and Leadership programme which is run by Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in association with Judge Business School, Cambridge. Subsequently, I am now a part of the national RCPsych Leadership and Management Leadership scheme and feel proud to be able to have the opportunity to represent my Trust and the deanery at a national level. 

As an International Medical Graduate (IMG), the deanery has helped me feel supported and valued, allowing me to maintain my enthusiasm and zeal for learning. Our TPDs Dr. Albert Michael & Dr. Rebecca Jacob and our Head of School Dr. Chris O’Loughlin are extremely approachable and I have always been able to count on their wise counsel whenever I have needed it. I highly recommend training in East of England.

Psychiatry Head of School
Chris O'Loughlin

Dr Chris O’Loughlin took up his role as Head of School in the East of England in 2017, bringing his enthusiasm for psychiatry training, fostered whilst Training Programme Director and Director of Medical Education for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Foundation Trust, to the regional level. He is a strong believer in the trainee experience in training and the workplace, combining this with social media (twitter @chrisol1) to promote recruitment to psychiatry and raise standards.   In 2018 he was the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Trainer of the Year.  He is also a case-manager with the Professional Support and Wellbeing Service.  Clinically , Dr O’Loughlin works as a general adult community psychiatrist in Cambridge.

 

Projects:

Foundation Psychiatry Fellowship posts and Longitudinal Posts 

Psychiatry recruitment

Professional Support and Wellbeing Service

Public Health FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

4 plus academic year

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

Local authorities, PHE teams, NHSE teams, CCGs, 2 acutes, and others

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

We don't strictly have sub rotations but we have split EoE into north and south zones

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Nationally

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

2 days regionally, staggered induction over 2 months in first placement

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Organised by ST year group

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Opportunities to practice PH skills in scenarios in preparation for part B 

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

Parts A and B of MFPH

Preparation is a mixed of cohort learning and practice and invidually-tailored learning in placements.

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

Some registrars pursue a PhD in preparation for an academic career; some focus on health protection or healthcare public health.

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

There are placements at UEA, UC, MRC. OOPRs are supported.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Not routine; can be accommodated.

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

Regional Website : https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/public_health

National Information : https://www.fph.org.uk/

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England?

  • High standard of training 
  • Excellent range of opportunities
  • Great quality of life outside training

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Public Health and why?

We Public Health types prefer to use public transport and active travel...but perhaps an electric car - always using the best available technology and information, always aiming to improve, always considering the wider implications for the population 

Public Health Trainee Review
Nicola, Bev and Fiona

Hi I’m Nicola and I’ve been lucky enough to work on the East of England South Public Health training programme since 2016.  I’m from a non-medical background - before training I worked as an analyst at NICE on interventional procedures and public health guidelines. The region is very friendly and all trainees are well looked after.  

The Deanery is very accommodating and allows trainees to work LTFT and I found it a very easy process to switch from full to part time working.  I completed the MPhil in Public Health at the University of Cambridge as part of the training and found this hugely enjoyable and a good preparation for many elements of the Part A professional exam (The Faculty of Public Health Diplomate Examination).   The work within Local Authority Placements is varied and interesting. In my time at Hertfordshire County council I’ve worked on a joint strategic needs assessment for looked after children, evaluated health services, written a business case for a physical activity campaign and much more.  There is a wide variety of placement opportunities available within the region and in London.

Trainees really support each other in this region and there are regular training events.  Support for exam preparation is exceptionally well co-ordinated.  I’m thoroughly enjoying my time here and I’m sure you will too. 

 

My name is Bev and I am currently an ST3 on the public health programme. I joined the training programme in 2017 after spending 22 years in nursing and I relocated to Suffolk to take up my post. My first 2 years were spent undertaking a Master’s in Public Health at the University of Cambridge and on placement with the  Suffolk County Council Public health team. During that time, I also undertook a four-month placement with the local health protection team and have recently started on-call health protection work, which I am really enjoying. I have had some fantastic opportunities and there is really good support from supervisors and training programme directors. We are a small speciality and have a very active Registrar group, which runs regional training events six times a year. I have been the group secretary for the last 12 months and I am now also a Health Protection rep for the group as this is a particular area of interest for me. With the support of a HEE bursary I am just about to start a Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education, which I’m really excited about. I have also had lots of training and study opportunities on the programme and there is excellent Faculty exam preparation on offer. My experience as a more mature trainee has been really positive and I’m so glad I made the move to the East of England. 

 

Hi I am Fiona, an ST2 Public Health registrar in my second year of five years of specialty training to become a Public Health Consultant. I am based in the East of England (based in Essex), and have a non-medical background. I started training as a specialty registrar in public health in August 2018 and have recently returned to working in the local authority, having completed a MPhil in Public Health in Cambridge as part of my first year of training. I’m really enjoying the wide range of work I can get involved in at my local authority, and I’m currently part of several projects looking at a range of areas of public health including: research on families living below the minimum income standard, referral pathways for financially disadvantaged children, workplace health and strength and balance services. I’m also working with my supervisor and research team from the MPhil to develop my thesis for publication, which is a great opportunity arising from training in the East of England. Along with the other trainees in my year I will be sitting the first of my professional exams, the Diplomate exam in Public Health, in January, so am making the most of the peer support and guidance from the training scheme in order to prepare for this milestone in my training.

Before the training programme my undergraduate studies were in Anatomy and Physiology. I joined the NHS in 2013 and have held a number of roles in the East of England, including training on the NHS Graduate management scheme as an Informatics trainee in the East of England (2013 intake), with placements at Hertfordshire Partnership Foundation Trust (HPFT), Specsavers and Mid Essex Hospital Trust (MEHT). Most recently I have spent the last 3 years working as a CCG planned care commissioner.

 

Public Health Head of School
Jan Yates

Jan is a senior Consultant in Public Health with experience at Director level. Highly motivated and action oriented. A sound, politically astute leader and effective team player. Able to deliver high quality, efficient health and care outcomes and provide professional support for effective decisions. Exceptional teaching skills with experience in coaching, mentoring and supporting staff through personal and organisational development. Jan's career history includes several years teaching followed by Public Health training and time as a Director of Public Health and in various regional and national level positions.

Projects: Public Health workforce development and oversight of speciality and practitioner training in public health

Radiology FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

The standard clinical radiology training program is 5 years. A couple of sub-specialities (interventional radiology and interventional neuroradiology have a ST6 year.

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Run through

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

There are three generally separate schemes in the region, from north to south, Norwich, Cambridge and EBH (Essex, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire). There is also a ST posts at Peterborough City Hospital, overseen by the Cambridge training program director but currently running as a stand alone site.

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

The EBH scheme tends to be based at single Trusts for the whole five years, as are the Peterborough trainees. Cambridge trainees are based at Addenbrooke's Hospital (or the now co-located Royal Papworth Hospital) for 4.5 years of the 5 year program with two 3-month attachments elsewhere (currently West Suffolk Hospital and Luton and Dunstable Hospital). Norwich trainees are at the Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) for 4 or the 5 years with two 6-months placements elsewhere, one in ST2 and one in ST4. There is some flexibility in rotation site, but typically the James Paget (Great Yarmouth), the QEH (King's Lynn) and Ipswich.

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

Nationally through London Deanery, opening in November with interviews in the Spring.

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Each of the programs has it's own local induction.

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

Each of the schemes have their own local teaching program. This is usually a half-day per week (EBH, Cambridge). The radiology academy tends to have longer structured teaching periods. In addition there are regional teaching days (e.g. paediatric imaging, interventional radiology simulation teaching, exam preparation run at different sites and open to all.

How many days of study leave do I get?

Local teaching days are built into the rota. Standard 30 day allowance for external course/conferences.

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

There are ultrasound simulators available in Essex and Norwich. Vascular interventional simulator at the Norwich radiology academy with hands-on sessions open to all EoE trainees.

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

There is the Part 1 FRCR exam taken in March of ST1 (physics and anatomy). The final FRCR exam is in two parts; A (single best answer written papers), typically taken near the end of ST3 and B (rapid reporting, written long cases, viva) typically taken from the beginning of ST4.

​There are formal teaching program as above, plus pre-exam mocks in Norwich and EBH. All sites also have extensive consultant delivered pre-exam tutorial teaching sessions.

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

All radiological subspecialities are available in the East of England. Interventional neuroradiology is only available at the Addenbrooke's site. There are MRI and breast fellowships in Cambridge with ST6 posts in interventional radiology. There are chest and cardiac imaging fellowships at the Royal Papworth Hospital. Breast, musculoskeletal imaging and (ST6) interventional radiology fellowships are available in Norwich.

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

There is a university department of radiology in Cambridge headed by Professor Fiona Gilbert with PhD opportunities. There is a research active department in Norwich with a track record of MD supervision. Clinical based projects at all site. EBH are keen to build research partnerships with the recently opening Essex Medical School. 

OOPRs are supported.

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

There is no formal overseas link. Trainees have taken overseas electives following discussion with training program directors.

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

The HEE east of England radiology page (https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/radiology).

Royal College of Radiologist website (https://www.rcr.ac.uk/clinical-radiology/specialty-training).  

The Norwich Radiology Academy website (www.norwichradiologyacademy.co.uk).

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • High level of consultant supervision and contact time
  • Three independent but inter-related training programs which make the geography more manageable whilst having regional resources available
  • Choice of living locations - historic cities and towns, villages, London borders.

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Radiology and why?

I don't know, but the car would have tinted windows to keep the light level down, a great dashboard system display, comfy seats, an innovative tool kit in the boot (and ideally a coffee machine in the front).

 

Radiology Trainee Review
Jennie

Hi, I'm Jennie and I am a Radiology Registrar in the East of England based at the Norwich Radiology Academy.

The Academy is a unique and fantastic place to undergo radiology training and I have thoroughly enjoyed my time here so far. The first year is carefully structured to allow trainees to learn the basics of radiology in a supported environment, which I feel is essential as this specialty is so vastly different to others that trainees may have worked in before. Also, in being an academy, we have a large registrar body which creates a wonderful collegiate atmosphere and helps to foster great friendships.

At Norwich, we are actively encouraged to take part in both teaching and research, with plenty of opportunities for teaching within the hospital and at the university. There are also various leadership and management courses which are offered both within Norwich and the East of England deanery, which are widely enjoyed. The in-house teaching is second-to-none in this training scheme with consultants going out of their way to help you learn and guide you through the FRCR exams, from physics and anatomy in your first year to the final viva-style exam.

Having recently returned to work from parental leave, I have been supported by the deanery, the academy staff, my registrar colleagues and consultants, who have been invaluable in helping me get settled back in again, using the Supported Return to Training plan.

I can highly recommend radiology training at the Norwich Radiology Academy in the East of England deanery. It enables people to become competent and confident radiologists by providing a hugely friendly, structured and supported training environment.

Radiology Head of School
Stuart Williams

Medical school in Oxford followed by medical jobs in Oxford, Birmingham and London.  Returned to Oxford for specialty training in radiology. Consultant at the Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) since 2001 with subspecialty interest in GI and oncological imaging. Various subsequent roles including being TPD for the Norwich Radiology Academy and clinical director for the NNUH radiology department. Fellowship at NICE. Honorary senior lecturer at Norwich Medical School. Examiner for the final part of the Fellowship exam at the RCR.

Projects

Current aim of expanding training numbers for radiology in the East of England as demand still outstrips supply at consultant appointment level. Increasing training capacity in cardiac imaging and in interventional radiology to cope with anticipated service developments. Working with ST HEE fellows to enhance trainee experience across the varied high quality training sites we have across the region.

Surgery FAQs

Training Program 

How many years is the training program?

6

Is the training run through or decoupled?

Decoupled

Which units in the East of England can I be trained in?

Addenbrookes, Basildon, Bedford, Broomfield, Colchester, Hinchingbrooke, Harlow, Ipswich, James Paget, King's Lynn, Lister, Luton, NNUH, Peterborough, Southend, Watford, West Suffolk

Are there more localized Sub-rotations to avoid long commutes?

Not specifically but personal preferences considered prior to allocations

 

Recruitment

How is recruitment organized?

National

 

Induction

What induction program is there into training in the region?

Single day prior to starting in region and then local with regular 7 days throughout year.

 

Curriculum Teaching & Study Leave

How is the regional teaching program structured?

7 days at Norfolk and Norwich, Addenbrookes and Luton 

How many days of study leave do I get?

30

 

Simulation Training

What opportunities are there for simulation training in the region?

Regular days for each sub-speciality, including regular opportunites at the Evelyn Centre

 

Exams

What exams will I have to sit during my training? Is there any preparation organised in the region?

MRCS, CCT

Exam Preparation is covered in training days

 

Fellowships & Sub-speclalty training

What Sub-specialty / fellowship training opportunities are there in the region?

Sub Specialty training offered in last 2 years

 

Research

What research opportunities are there in the region? Do you support Out Of Program Research (OOPR)?

Academic posts and support for research

OOPRs are supported

 

Global Health

Is there scope for work overseas during my training?

Yes

 

More information

Where can I go for more information?

https://heeoe.hee.nhs.uk/surgery

Royal College of Surgeons, Joint Committee on Surgical training, Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Portfolio

 

What are the top 3 reasons for training in the East of England

  • Enthusiasm of trainers, great colleagues
  • Volume of technical opportunities
  • High level specialisation

 

If Medicine was a car industry, which car would represent Surgery and why?

Aston Martin, an example where the British excel and which is both inspirational and aspirational but most of all, fun to drive.

Surgery Trainee Review

Coming soon! Menawhie check out our Surgery website.

Surgery Head of School
Mark Bowditch

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon since 2000 based at East Suffolk & North Essex Foundation Trust (Ipswich & Colchester).  I’ve been involved in T&O education and training in the East of England for over 25 years as regional and national specialist trainee committee rep and then orthopaedic tutor in Ipswich, then deputy TPD and TPD from 2006-2017. Nationally I represented all four Royal surgical Colleges as the Specialty Advisory Committee SAC Chair (lead for T&O training) 2017-2020 including rewriting the 2020 curriculum.  From 2018 I have been the East of England HoS Surgery. We have a superb training opportunities, facilities and faculty across the whole breadth of the surgical specialties in our region. I am delighted to represent them.

Wednesday, 27 November, 2019
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